Sip a faux hot toddy. Cut a vitamin C–rich lemon in half and squeeze the juice from one half into a cup. Studies show that vitamin C taken before the onset of a cold shortens its duration and severity. Drop the lemon half shell into the cup. Add boiling water and a teaspoon of organic raw honey, an immunity booster that also coats painful throat tissues. Breathe in the healing vapor to open sinuses, and sip a cupful two or three times daily to fight the bug. (To make a traditional hot toddy, add a half shot of brandy.)
If you find yourself avoiding getting up-close with people for fear of your own bad breath–and brushing and flossing twice daily does nothing to help, try this. Oil pulling fans swear by the technique’s ability to freshen breath for way longer than an Altoid or packet of gum. Simply swish around a table spoon of coconut oil in your mouth for 20 minutes each day before cleaning your teeth. Interested? Check out a bunch of other benefits of swishing with oil here.
Dan I would like to comment on your statement of potentcy. The standard for pharmaceuticals is measured in miligrams which varies in potentcy by numbers obviously the higher the number, the higher the dosage, the stronger the potentcy. The higher the miligram for one person could kill another. For example I'm on 10 miligrams of methadone this same dosage given to you could possibly put you in the hospital with an overdose causing some kind of complication. What I'm trying to get at is how does one measure the potency of herbal medicine?
Your body can throw you for a loop at any time. You wake up with a sore throat the day you're set to make a major presentation, a seafood-salad sandwich leaves you with grumbling indigestion, or you overdo it at the gym and arrive home with a stiff neck. Wouldn't it be great to have a live-in doctor/therapist/trainer to tend to your everyday aches and pains? (The Power Nutrient Solution is the first-ever plan that tackles the root cause of virtually every major ailment and health condition. Get your copy today!)
I absolutely recommend "Herbal Medicine: Natural Remedies" to everyone, except advanced herbalists and those who are very experienced and knowledgeable about different herbs, DIY recipes, and herbal remedies. For those people, this may be a bit too simplified. But for everyone else, this is really cool, fascinating stuff that is very correct in its information.
While this book has an interesting layout with lots of recipes, unfortunately it is not reliable. As someone with over twenty years of experience using herbs, it concerns me that people new to herbalism may be using this as a guide. For starters, this book doesn’t seem to differentiate between internal and external use such as the precaution not to use a ginger while taking certain medications at the end of a recipe for ginger salve when internal use is the only concern there. It also offers the precaution not to use a rosemary tincture hair product if you have epilepsy when that precaution refers to essential oil use, not tincture use. Not making these distinctions is sloppy and can lead to confusion. As another couple of examples, the photo accompanying the section on catnip (Nepeta cataria) is actually another more showy member of the Nepeta genus and the picture of chamomile is some kind of cultivated daisy which does make one wonder how familiar the author actually is with these plants. Reading through the book, I get the feeling the author has read studies and articles about the herbs but has little real practical experience or in-depth understanding of the herbs about which she is writing. While I'm certainly not familiar with every single application of common herbs, some of the applications she suggests don't seem to me to be based on either traditional use or scientific studies. Since she doesn't reference any studies or other herbalists or share her own anecdotal experiences, one does wonder where she comes up with certain applications such as feverfew as a nervine for fatigue from stress, as one example. There are plenty of other herbals out there which are not only more accurate but also more engaging. One such book which actually lives up to what this book purports to be is Rosemary Gladstar's Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health.
When you think about alternative medicine and home remedies, you may have lots of questions: Are these treatments effective? How do they work? "Mayo Clinic Book of Alternative Medicine and Home Remedies" aims to answer them. It explains how to treat common health problems at home and when to use certain remedies. You’ll also find information on how to tell if your symptoms are a sign of a medical emergency and when it’s time to get your doctor involved.

Sepel recommends warm water with lemons in the morning: “One of my top tips is warm lemon water. I enjoy this hydration boost every morning to prepare my body for digestion and detoxification. Probiotics are also essential, whether it’s in supplement form or probiotic-rich foods like fermented vegetables, tempeh and organic yoghurt. I also encourage my clients to cut gluten for a few weeks as it causes bloating and digestive discomfort for so many,” she said.
But you should limit use to a day or two. When used too much, OTC nasal decongestants can lead to a complication called rhinitis medicamentosa (RM), also known as rebound rhinitis. This condition is characterized by nasal congestion that is triggered by the overuse of topical vasoconstrictive medications, especially intranasal decongestants, says Raj Dasgupta, MD, an assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine.
“Low fat and fat-free foods are loaded with sugar, and the body stores extra sugar as fat. Don’t be afraid of good fats like avocado, olive oil, nuts and seeds–they give you an energy boost and keep you full longer. And learn to love veggies –they’re loaded with fiber and B-vitamins, which help purify your system. A clean body is a lean body,” she said.
To reduce the tickle in your throat, try an astringent gargle -- such as tea that contains tannin -- to tighten the membranes. Or use a thick, viscous gargle made with honey or honey and apple cider vinegar. Seep one tablespoon of raspberry leaves or lemon juice in two cups of hot water; mix with one teaspoon of honey. Let the mixture cool to room temperature before gargling.
If you’re super stressed and worn out, your body’s immune system will have a harder time with the recovery process—so get some rest! Time in bed or away from life’s usual stressors—like work, taking care of the kids, and cleaning up the house—can help recharge your immune system, Dr. Finkelston says. Aim for at least 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night.

Bathe in your breakfast. Although oatmeal is a centuries-old skin soother, researchers only recently recognized the avenanthramides in oats as the key compounds that calm inflamed, itchy skin. Put whole oats in a clean, dry sock. Seal the open end with a rubber band, and then drop the sock into a warm or hot bath. Soak yourself for 15 to 20 minutes. (Winterize your skin care routine with our best cold-weather tips.)

Getting started with home remedies, natural treatments and alternative medicine is simple enough… in fact, you'll probably find everything you need right here, in your kitchen. Just scout around, add a little bit of this, a dash of that, and you're good to go! A healing mixture of honey & ginger juice can cure a cough, while a few dry figs soaked overnight can cure constipation. It isn't rocket science and it does not require a deep understanding of human anatomy!
To the elderly, who are suffering cardiovascular disease, liver cirrhosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, constipation is even more dangerous as a straining and difficult bowel movement can increase blood pressure, a risk of cerebral embolism, shortness of breath and so on, which may cause sudden death. The stagnation of stool in the colon for long days also cause intestinal obstruction or facilitate the development of harmful bacteria, promoting the risk of other diseases and infections.
Another factor is to get more exercise and physical activities which will eliminate your constipation problems completely. If you lead a sedentary life, your intestines will become weak and stool will not be able to pass through. However, being involved with jogging, swimming, walking, and workouts will see you in great shape and you will not face all these problems.
I absolutely recommend "Herbal Medicine: Natural Remedies" to everyone, except advanced herbalists and those who are very experienced and knowledgeable about different herbs, DIY recipes, and herbal remedies. For those people, this may be a bit too simplified. But for everyone else, this is really cool, fascinating stuff that is very correct in its information.
Reviews | “I love the simplicity of introducing herbs through food and cooking. Food should always be our first medicine…I like that [the recipes] are all very doable: no specialized equipment, no huge orders of exotic herbs and spices and no tricky culinary skills required. The author has done a remarkable job of making herbal support both legitimate to the doubtful and accessible to the open-minded.” – Sue Kusch, Amazon Review
Anyone who calls herbs hazardous is totally misinformed. Every year the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) compiles statistics on accidental deaths from drugs, herbs, vitamins, and other supplements. The AAPCC’s most recent report (2008) records 1,756 accidental poisoning deaths. How many were attributable to medicinal herbs? Zero. In every accidental death caused by a pharmacological agent, the culprit was a pharmaceutical. And it’s been that way for many years. Herbs are safer than drugs.
But you should limit use to a day or two. When used too much, OTC nasal decongestants can lead to a complication called rhinitis medicamentosa (RM), also known as rebound rhinitis. This condition is characterized by nasal congestion that is triggered by the overuse of topical vasoconstrictive medications, especially intranasal decongestants, says Raj Dasgupta, MD, an assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine.
If you are interested in learning more about herbal medicines and natural remedies—either to grow and harvest your own herbs or solely to further your knowledge—we’ve put together a curated list of our favorite books currently on the market. Some include recipes, others contain information about identifying herbs in their natural environment, but they all are comprehensive, straight-forward, and written by experts in the field. 

I am a big believer in natural remedies and alternative practices and smart approaches to health. I go to both a naturopath and an MD and learn from both. This book provides a great resource and I've not only read it cover to cover but gone back when specific problems are bothering me or I need a reminder. I've also given it to several friends who loved it as well.

As mentioned above, constipation is a common condition; however, it should be noticed that chronic constipation could be dangerous for people’s health. There are some serious complications that may appear when you are constipated for a long time, including the systematic symptoms listed such as pain, stress, heart diseases and malnutrition. Furthermore, in some cases, constipation also leads to hemorrhoids and even cancer.

Your body can throw you for a loop at any time. You wake up with a sore throat the day you're set to make a major presentation, a seafood-salad sandwich leaves you with grumbling indigestion, or you overdo it at the gym and arrive home with a stiff neck. Wouldn't it be great to have a live-in doctor/therapist/trainer to tend to your everyday aches and pains? (The Power Nutrient Solution is the first-ever plan that tackles the root cause of virtually every major ailment and health condition. Get your copy today!)
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