Reviews | “I love the simplicity of introducing herbs through food and cooking. Food should always be our first medicine…I like that [the recipes] are all very doable: no specialized equipment, no huge orders of exotic herbs and spices and no tricky culinary skills required. The author has done a remarkable job of making herbal support both legitimate to the doubtful and accessible to the open-minded.” – Sue Kusch, Amazon Review
Ask around like we did and sure enough you begin to acquire a valuable database of folk remedies. Everyone we asked had a home remedy or two; a grandmother's remedy to cure gout (apple cider vinegar), a sister's Ayurvedic remedy to stop diarrhea within minutes (turmeric), an old Mexican cure for a nagging cough (garlic). Thrilled to have this treasure chest of recipes to cure acute and chronic conditions, we started to post these remedies on Earth Clinic back in 1999. Not long after that, our readers started responding with their own family remedies. If you don't see what you're looking for in this Home Remedies section, please check out our extensive Ailments section.
Black tea is chock-full of astringent compounds called tannins that can help deflate and tighten the bags under your eyes. (Not to mention black tea is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.) Activate the tannins in a tea bag by dipping in a cup of hot water for several minutes. Cool in the fridge, then apply the damp bag as a compress to the closed eye for 10 minutes.
Sip linden flower tea, which works in two ways: It stimulates the hypothalamus to better control your temperature, and it dilates blood vessels, inducing sweating. Steep 1 tablespoon of dried herb (available in health food stores) in a cup of hot water for 15 minutes, then sip. Drink three to four cups a day. If you still run hot after a day of sipping tea, seek medical attention. 
The principles of Ayurveda can be applied in lots of different ways. In "Balance Your Hormones, Balance Your Life," Dr. Claudia Welch uses them to help women restore balance to hormones. She explains that high stress levels, lack of sleep, and an unhealthy diet can cause hormones to get off balance. Dr. Welch provides tools from the ancient medicine practice and explains how you can use them.
Mint has been used for hundreds of years as a health remedy. Peppermint oil might help with irritable bowel syndrome -- a long-term condition that can cause cramps, bloating, gas, diarrhea, and constipation -- and it may be good for headaches as well. More studies are needed to see how much it helps and why. People use the leaf for other conditions, too, but there’s very little evidence it helps with any of them. 
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