Aphrodisiac RemediesApple Cider VinegarApple Cider Vinegar and Baking SodaApple Cider Vinegar BathsApple Cider Vinegar CapsulesApple Cider Vinegar for Weight LossApple Cider Vinegar: HomemadeApple Cider Vinegar RecipesApple Cider Vinegar Side EffectsApple Cider Vinegar, The MotherApple Cider Vinegar TonicApple Cider Vinegar: Where to BuyApplesArtemisininAsthmaAyurvedic Herbal Remedies
I am a big believer in natural remedies and alternative practices and smart approaches to health. I go to both a naturopath and an MD and learn from both. This book provides a great resource and I've not only read it cover to cover but gone back when specific problems are bothering me or I need a reminder. I've also given it to several friends who loved it as well.
Believe it or not, your toothbrush may be perpetuating—or even causing—your sore throat. Bacteria collect on the bristles, and any injury to the gums during brushing injects these germs into your system. As soon as you start feeling ill, throw away your toothbrush. Often that’s enough to stop the illness in its tracks. “Changing your toothbrush is often recommended for patients with bacterial throat infections to eliminate the spread of infection,” Dr. Abramowitz says.
A stiff neck results from slowed circulation and lymph flow to muscle tissues. Use contrast hydrotherapy—a quick blast of hot, then cold water—to get the blood pumping again. In the shower, first run hot water over your neck for 20 seconds to increase blood flow, then switch to cold for 10 seconds to constrict blood flow. Alternate three times, always ending with cold. When you get out of the shower, your body will send the blood back out to the skin, which results in a final dilation of blood vessels and—voilà!—a looser neck. 
I just got this book and I have to say, even though I am only half way through it, this book is a gem. It explains, in an easy to understand manner, how to address what ails you in a natural manner, with information from leading doctors. Health issues are alphabetical making it easy to search your concerns. It is comprehensive and will become a go to reference when this tired baby boomer couple is greeted with the next surprise health issue. ( I recall my parents saying at least you've got your health and thought what are they talking about. Now I know.) The author also tells you where to find the herbs and natural remedies referenced (i.e., what stores carry what is often noted) and this is very helpful.

But you should limit use to a day or two. When used too much, OTC nasal decongestants can lead to a complication called rhinitis medicamentosa (RM), also known as rebound rhinitis. This condition is characterized by nasal congestion that is triggered by the overuse of topical vasoconstrictive medications, especially intranasal decongestants, says Raj Dasgupta, MD, an assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine.


It’s been used for thousands of years in Asian medicine to treat stomachaches, diarrhea, and nausea, and studies show that it works for nausea and vomiting. There’s some evidence that it might help with menstrual cramps, too. But it’s not necessarily good for everyone. Some people get tummy trouble, heartburn, diarrhea, and gas because of it, and it may affect how some medications work. So talk to your doctor, and use it with care.
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