Besides, constipation can be caused by physical injury and systemic diseases, such as high fever infection status, postoperative blood loss, stroke, diabetes, thyroid disease and Parkinson’s disease. Other reasons for constipation include problems in intestine, for examples, lesions of the rectum and anus, rectal and anal stenosis as well as intestinal obstruction or diverticulitis
Silica and zinc are key for beautiful, shiny hair, and are found in so many foods. “For hair growth, silica is key,” Sepel explained, recommending we “include lots of green leafy vegetables, cucumber, zucchini, mango, and beans. Zinc is equally important and can be found in things like eggs, pecans, Brazil nuts, and fresh oysters. Oily fish is another must for shiny hair.”
Sip linden flower tea, which works in two ways: It stimulates the hypothalamus to better control your temperature, and it dilates blood vessels, inducing sweating. Steep 1 tablespoon of dried herb (available in health food stores) in a cup of hot water for 15 minutes, then sip. Drink three to four cups a day. If you still run hot after a day of sipping tea, seek medical attention. 
Aphrodisiac RemediesApple Cider VinegarApple Cider Vinegar and Baking SodaApple Cider Vinegar BathsApple Cider Vinegar CapsulesApple Cider Vinegar for Weight LossApple Cider Vinegar: HomemadeApple Cider Vinegar RecipesApple Cider Vinegar Side EffectsApple Cider Vinegar, The MotherApple Cider Vinegar TonicApple Cider Vinegar: Where to BuyApplesArtemisininAsthmaAyurvedic Herbal Remedies

I am a big believer in natural remedies and alternative practices and smart approaches to health. I go to both a naturopath and an MD and learn from both. This book provides a great resource and I've not only read it cover to cover but gone back when specific problems are bothering me or I need a reminder. I've also given it to several friends who loved it as well.


Acid reflux—which occurs when acids produced by your stomach make their way into the throat—is a common cause of a sore throat, Dr. Comer says. That means anything you do to stoke acid reflux could prolong or worsen a sore throat. For that reason, Dr. Comer recommends avoiding soda, fried foods, and citrus fruits like oranges and lemons. Also, skip food altogether for an hour before bed. Eating before you lie down can promote reflux and heartburn.
In her recently released book, Alchemy of Herbs: Transform Everyday Ingredients into Foods and Remedies That Heal, Registered Herbalist Rosalee De La Forêt has one mission: to teach readers how to transform everyday ingredients into natural remedies. More plainly put, she wants to show you how to heal your body with foods and ingredients you already have in your kitchen cupboard.
Getting started with home remedies, natural treatments and alternative medicine is simple enough… in fact, you'll probably find everything you need right here, in your kitchen. Just scout around, add a little bit of this, a dash of that, and you're good to go! A healing mixture of honey & ginger juice can cure a cough, while a few dry figs soaked overnight can cure constipation. It isn't rocket science and it does not require a deep understanding of human anatomy!
Sepel recommends warm water with lemons in the morning: “One of my top tips is warm lemon water. I enjoy this hydration boost every morning to prepare my body for digestion and detoxification. Probiotics are also essential, whether it’s in supplement form or probiotic-rich foods like fermented vegetables, tempeh and organic yoghurt. I also encourage my clients to cut gluten for a few weeks as it causes bloating and digestive discomfort for so many,” she said.
Dan I would like to comment on your statement of potentcy. The standard for pharmaceuticals is measured in miligrams which varies in potentcy by numbers obviously the higher the number, the higher the dosage, the stronger the potentcy. The higher the miligram for one person could kill another. For example I'm on 10 miligrams of methadone this same dosage given to you could possibly put you in the hospital with an overdose causing some kind of complication. What I'm trying to get at is how does one measure the potency of herbal medicine?
Bathe in your breakfast. Although oatmeal is a centuries-old skin soother, researchers only recently recognized the avenanthramides in oats as the key compounds that calm inflamed, itchy skin. Put whole oats in a clean, dry sock. Seal the open end with a rubber band, and then drop the sock into a warm or hot bath. Soak yourself for 15 to 20 minutes. (Winterize your skin care routine with our best cold-weather tips.)
I just got this book and I have to say, even though I am only half way through it, this book is a gem. It explains, in an easy to understand manner, how to address what ails you in a natural manner, with information from leading doctors. Health issues are alphabetical making it easy to search your concerns. It is comprehensive and will become a go to reference when this tired baby boomer couple is greeted with the next surprise health issue. ( I recall my parents saying at least you've got your health and thought what are they talking about. Now I know.) The author also tells you where to find the herbs and natural remedies referenced (i.e., what stores carry what is often noted) and this is very helpful.

Typically, the waste of digestion (stool) gets out of the body through intestines by muscular contraction. In the colon, most of water and salt of the waste are reabsorbed because it is necessary for the body. However, when the intestines absorb too much water or the colon contracts slowly, the stool becomes dry, hard and difficult to pass through the colon. This is the root cause of constipation.
Black tea is chock-full of astringent compounds called tannins that can help deflate and tighten the bags under your eyes. (Not to mention black tea is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.) Activate the tannins in a tea bag by dipping in a cup of hot water for several minutes. Cool in the fridge, then apply the damp bag as a compress to the closed eye for 10 minutes.
Dry air can irritate a sore throat, prolonging your recovery time. Taking a steamy shower or using a humidifier can bring moisture back into the air, thus relieving any discomfort. “The mucus membranes of the nose and throat love moisture,” Dr. Abramowitz says. “Steam provides moisture and warmth, which helps the vocal cords calm down and decrease in swelling.” The moisture in your nose can also help clear out mucus and gunk, which can be part of the problem, he adds.
While this book has an interesting layout with lots of recipes, unfortunately it is not reliable. As someone with over twenty years of experience using herbs, it concerns me that people new to herbalism may be using this as a guide. For starters, this book doesn’t seem to differentiate between internal and external use such as the precaution not to use a ginger while taking certain medications at the end of a recipe for ginger salve when internal use is the only concern there. It also offers the precaution not to use a rosemary tincture hair product if you have epilepsy when that precaution refers to essential oil use, not tincture use. Not making these distinctions is sloppy and can lead to confusion. As another couple of examples, the photo accompanying the section on catnip (Nepeta cataria) is actually another more showy member of the Nepeta genus and the picture of chamomile is some kind of cultivated daisy which does make one wonder how familiar the author actually is with these plants. Reading through the book, I get the feeling the author has read studies and articles about the herbs but has little real practical experience or in-depth understanding of the herbs about which she is writing. While I'm certainly not familiar with every single application of common herbs, some of the applications she suggests don't seem to me to be based on either traditional use or scientific studies. Since she doesn't reference any studies or other herbalists or share her own anecdotal experiences, one does wonder where she comes up with certain applications such as feverfew as a nervine for fatigue from stress, as one example. There are plenty of other herbals out there which are not only more accurate but also more engaging. One such book which actually lives up to what this book purports to be is Rosemary Gladstar's Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health.
Dry air can irritate a sore throat, prolonging your recovery time. Taking a steamy shower or using a humidifier can bring moisture back into the air, thus relieving any discomfort. “The mucus membranes of the nose and throat love moisture,” Dr. Abramowitz says. “Steam provides moisture and warmth, which helps the vocal cords calm down and decrease in swelling.” The moisture in your nose can also help clear out mucus and gunk, which can be part of the problem, he adds.
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Sip linden flower tea, which works in two ways: It stimulates the hypothalamus to better control your temperature, and it dilates blood vessels, inducing sweating. Steep 1 tablespoon of dried herb (available in health food stores) in a cup of hot water for 15 minutes, then sip. Drink three to four cups a day. If you still run hot after a day of sipping tea, seek medical attention. 
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