Sip a faux hot toddy. Cut a vitamin C–rich lemon in half and squeeze the juice from one half into a cup. Studies show that vitamin C taken before the onset of a cold shortens its duration and severity. Drop the lemon half shell into the cup. Add boiling water and a teaspoon of organic raw honey, an immunity booster that also coats painful throat tissues. Breathe in the healing vapor to open sinuses, and sip a cupful two or three times daily to fight the bug. (To make a traditional hot toddy, add a half shot of brandy.)
In general, a viral infection usually comes with other symptoms, like muscle aches and fatigue, along with your sore throat, says Chester Griffiths MD, an otolaryngologist at Providence Saint John’s Health Center in Santa Monica, Calif. With a bacterial infection, on the other hand, the pain is usually more focused on your throat and the soreness tends to be pretty severe, Dr. Griffiths says. You may also have intense pain when you swallow, along with a high fever.

Bathe in your breakfast. Although oatmeal is a centuries-old skin soother, researchers only recently recognized the avenanthramides in oats as the key compounds that calm inflamed, itchy skin. Put whole oats in a clean, dry sock. Seal the open end with a rubber band, and then drop the sock into a warm or hot bath. Soak yourself for 15 to 20 minutes. (Winterize your skin care routine with our best cold-weather tips.)

Ask around like we did and sure enough you begin to acquire a valuable database of folk remedies. Everyone we asked had a home remedy or two; a grandmother's remedy to cure gout (apple cider vinegar), a sister's Ayurvedic remedy to stop diarrhea within minutes (turmeric), an old Mexican cure for a nagging cough (garlic). Thrilled to have this treasure chest of recipes to cure acute and chronic conditions, we started to post these remedies on Earth Clinic back in 1999. Not long after that, our readers started responding with their own family remedies. If you don't see what you're looking for in this Home Remedies section, please check out our extensive Ailments section.


Reviews | “…This is definitely an excellent addition to your herbal library! Easy to read and understand, but thorough in its information! I am extremely pleased I purchased it! I plan to share this title with others when I teach courses on herbalism as it provides an excellent foundation and builds to advanced skills.” – Kelly Pagel, Amazon Review
Wow! They are either very superficial shallow.. cause I saw their kids playing with each other and a picture they all had matching swimsuits. Unfortunately, she probably had a tisk with Tristen. She hoped it would stay a secret. The difference is that Larsa kid is friends with North so they probably agreed to stay cordial for the friendship of their kids. I think if Larsa talked like Jordyn being on shows, talking on social media, things would of had a different ending. Larsa cheated on her husband with Future so it would not surprise me if she snuck around with that womanizer Tristen.

Aphrodisiac RemediesApple Cider VinegarApple Cider Vinegar and Baking SodaApple Cider Vinegar BathsApple Cider Vinegar CapsulesApple Cider Vinegar for Weight LossApple Cider Vinegar: HomemadeApple Cider Vinegar RecipesApple Cider Vinegar Side EffectsApple Cider Vinegar, The MotherApple Cider Vinegar TonicApple Cider Vinegar: Where to BuyApplesArtemisininAsthmaAyurvedic Herbal Remedies
At MOTHER EARTH NEWS for 50 years and counting, we are dedicated to conserving our planet's natural resources while helping you conserve your financial resources. You'll find tips for slashing heating bills, growing fresh, natural produce at home, and more. That's why we want you to save money and trees by subscribing through our earth-friendly automatic renewal savings plan. By paying with a credit card, you save an additional $5 and get 6 issues of MOTHER EARTH NEWS for only $12.95 (USA only).
When it's about her I just turn into Homer I can't help it. Those tests are not 100% accurate. DOH! We moved for freedom but we mooch the LA house and we're probably going to party with someone's freebies. DOH! We hate publicity but look at the headlines that we plan a party. DOH! We're suing over drones but of course there will be no paps at my Cooped Up party. DOH!

Read more Articles - Alternative Medicine and Health | General Health & fitness | Nutrition | Health advice | Injuries | Weight-Loss / Obesity | Exercise | Yoga | Meditation | Hair-Loss | Beauty | Women's-Issues | Men's-Issues | Wellness | Diet | Medicines and Remedies | Dental fitness | Ears | Aromatherapy | Massage Health Therapy | Diet Health Club | Skin Care at Home | Diseases and Ailments | Procedures-Surgeries | Therapies-Practices | Remedy Recipes


Black tea is chock-full of astringent compounds called tannins that can help deflate and tighten the bags under your eyes. (Not to mention black tea is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.) Activate the tannins in a tea bag by dipping in a cup of hot water for several minutes. Cool in the fridge, then apply the damp bag as a compress to the closed eye for 10 minutes.

While this book has an interesting layout with lots of recipes, unfortunately it is not reliable. As someone with over twenty years of experience using herbs, it concerns me that people new to herbalism may be using this as a guide. For starters, this book doesn’t seem to differentiate between internal and external use such as the precaution not to use a ginger while taking certain medications at the end of a recipe for ginger salve when internal use is the only concern there. It also offers the precaution not to use a rosemary tincture hair product if you have epilepsy when that precaution refers to essential oil use, not tincture use. Not making these distinctions is sloppy and can lead to confusion. As another couple of examples, the photo accompanying the section on catnip (Nepeta cataria) is actually another more showy member of the Nepeta genus and the picture of chamomile is some kind of cultivated daisy which does make one wonder how familiar the author actually is with these plants. Reading through the book, I get the feeling the author has read studies and articles about the herbs but has little real practical experience or in-depth understanding of the herbs about which she is writing. While I'm certainly not familiar with every single application of common herbs, some of the applications she suggests don't seem to me to be based on either traditional use or scientific studies. Since she doesn't reference any studies or other herbalists or share her own anecdotal experiences, one does wonder where she comes up with certain applications such as feverfew as a nervine for fatigue from stress, as one example. There are plenty of other herbals out there which are not only more accurate but also more engaging. One such book which actually lives up to what this book purports to be is Rosemary Gladstar's Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health.
Sip a faux hot toddy. Cut a vitamin C–rich lemon in half and squeeze the juice from one half into a cup. Studies show that vitamin C taken before the onset of a cold shortens its duration and severity. Drop the lemon half shell into the cup. Add boiling water and a teaspoon of organic raw honey, an immunity booster that also coats painful throat tissues. Breathe in the healing vapor to open sinuses, and sip a cupful two or three times daily to fight the bug. (To make a traditional hot toddy, add a half shot of brandy.)
If you find yourself avoiding getting up-close with people for fear of your own bad breath–and brushing and flossing twice daily does nothing to help, try this. Oil pulling fans swear by the technique’s ability to freshen breath for way longer than an Altoid or packet of gum. Simply swish around a table spoon of coconut oil in your mouth for 20 minutes each day before cleaning your teeth. Interested? Check out a bunch of other benefits of swishing with oil here.
×